3 Facebook promo suggestions not mentioned in my book…

We helped ruin Myspace.  Everyone thought they were going to market like Dane Cook and become famous to millions via the internet.  We didn’t even really post anything funny, just pictures, our schedules (remember the guy who would post all three Saturday shows on his calendar to make it look fuller?), and the invites.  Oh, the invites.  The one major thing flaw has carried over to Facebook.

1.  Stop inviting everyone to everything…

Be selective with who you invite or your friends will use the greatest Facebook feature ever created, Ignore all invites from (open mic comic from NY city who’s never performed in a paid show).  I estimate over a hundred people who I’ve added to this list (which also includes garage sale invite lady from the Midwest).  I understand you have bringer shows in some cities but if you want your friends to come, call them and invite them like an adult.  If you’re not close enough friends to call, they probably don’t want to see you do four minutes of “gettin’ better!” anyway.  Always avoid inviting people who live in a different city/time zone.

2.  Be funny on your own with pictures and status updates…

Yes, occasionally you see a funny meme, but sharing a half-dozen e-cards that some stranger (also from the Midwest) thought up bragging about how early in the day you’ve started drinking doesn’t make you a comedian.  Anyone can share material that someone else thought up, write your own funny captions or status updates.  If you can’t, then you probably know why none of your friends are coming to see you at open mic.  I understand, sometimes a meme makes a point or political statement that you want to share, but the allout-wacky-for no-reason stuff…no.

(Side note: Your political statements aren’t changing anyone’s mind, you’re just causing more anger and polarization amongst your following).

Sorry, I’m starting to sound mad, I’m really not.  I’m venting on behalf of the dozens of friends and fellow comedians who also mention these things.

3.  Tone down the show posters…

Your audience has become numb to these as well.  Anytime there’s a flashy poster in my Facebook feed I immediately ignore it because it’s one of dozens.  It’s overcompensating.  I’ve heard a lot of the headliners in the business (the guys who you want to respect you so they’ll help you out later on) mock these as they skim through Facebook in the green room.  I know they’re not hard to make, but spend that time writing new material or improving what you have.  Artistic promo isn’t going to make your career.  Also, if you want your show to sound professional, don’t title it, “The Broken Tampons of comedy proudly present…The Shit-Slackers!”  Be funny during the show and people will go to more of them.  Who do you want as your following?  People with money…or Beavis?  Respect your career without taking yourself too seriously.

Remember when you used to scan through your feed and stop and look at pictures?  It’s gotten to the point where I’m skimming through the abundance of pictures and actually stopping when someone actually writes something because it’s so rare.

Here’s a tip for promoting your show.  Mention it in a status update along with a mildly witty comment.  It doesn’t have to be hilarious, just something cute and modest.  Overdoing marketing voids the amount of Facebook friends you have because they’ll ignore all of your updates.  It’s a fine line, I understand.  I’ve felt the backlash from selling books and giving free advice every week.  My excuse is that I’ve received a lot of positive feedback and I’m actually making money…and I fancy myself a decently funny status update writer so I get to scatter in a few commercials as a trade-off, right?  And all this free advice that isn’t even from the book.  Anyway, order Don’t Wear Shorts on Stage here…

www.robdurhamcomedy.com  or click the icons in the right margin.

 

Please feel free to  share this post.

Advertisements

About Rob Durham

With an English Degree, three years as a doorman at the Columbus Funnybone, over a decade of stand-up experience, and a recent certification in teaching high school English class, writing a book seemed like the next inevitable step for Rob Durham. The son of a coach, Rob has an excellent ability to teach and explain things in the easiest and most direct way possible. His (often labeled ridiculous) memory allows him to think of every possible situation that a new comic might face because at one point he was there too. Rob gives an inside look at comedy that doesn’t sugarcoat the challenges every performer faces. Without ego and the myth that “anyone can do it” Rob gives the reader a true feel of what living the so-called dream feels like, from preparing for that first open mic night to touring the country. View all posts by Rob Durham

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: