What NOT to do around a famous headliner…

As an emcee, one of the biggest thrills in your comedy career is getting to open for someone famous.  The shows will be packed, the crowds will be hot, and you get to hang out with a famous comic who might even be one of your heroes.  In your head you picture a post-show scenario where you’re now best buds sorting through all of the groupies while getting filled in on your new calendar because this famous headliner simply must have you emcee the remainder of the tour, but realistically it’s just another show for them and you’re just another overly excited opener.  So how do you get anywhere close to this ideal situation of them remembering you for future opportunities?

  1.  Don’t be a talker–After introducing yourself, be a listener.  Famous people usually want to establish themselves as a nice person, so let them do the joking (caution: inevitable name-dropping in this entry).  Upon seconds of shaking Bob Saget’s hand he was explaining to me that I should wash up because he had AIDS.  He was very talkative so I sat back and listened.  This is key when you’re just hanging out in the green room before shows.  Famous people usually don’t care about your story, listen to theirs. Babbling on and on about your short comedy career (which often leads to complaining) isn’t going to get you anywhere.  Ask a few questions and see if any advice comes out of it.
  2. Wait until afterwards for photos, autographs, etc.–A lot of headliners still get nervous before shows.  Famous comics (especially those whose fame came from something other than stand-up) still worry about how they’ll do.  There’s an anxiety when performing in front of people who paid way more than usual to see a show and the feature act is out there killing it.  They have high expectations to fill so after traveling all day, the headliner probably needs to get focused before a show.
  3. Don’t bring other people into the green room–Yes, introducing the person you just started dating to someone from their favorite season of SNL trumps Netflix n chill any night of the week, but backstage should be off limits, especially before a show.  The comic doesn’t want to have to be “on” before showtime.  A lot of times the green room is tiny and they need space.  It goes back to #2 as well.
  4. Minimize drinking–They probably aren’t drinking (half of them are recovering), so it’s hard to follow rule #1 when you’re even two drinks ahead.  You’ll just get too chatty and annoying.

So what can you do to build some sort of bond?
*Be patient–Ultimately it has to do with your act.  If you’re good, they’ll open up to you more and treat you with more respect.  If it’s a 2 or 3 night event, just back off that first night especially.

*Offer to pick them up from the hotel (ask the club manager, not the headliner)–with smaller clubs there isn’t always a designated person to do this.  As a doorman and emcee at Columbus years ago, I had a lot of rides with really famous people in my ’94 Escort (it sure humbled Joe Rogan).  Sometimes they’ll even throw you some money.  A lot of what I learned came from these short drives.  It also allows you to…

*Get their number–This shows they trust you.  Don’t just flat out ask, but management will give it to you if you’re giving them a lift.  Obviously you’re not going to call, but if you and the feature are going out to lunch during the week you can text and invite the headliner as well.  You could mention it after the last show of the night with the feature and see if the headliner is interested.  If so, that’s when you’ll get it.  However, keep it at lunch–they don’t want to write with you 99% of the time.

Progressing in stand-up has a lot to do with the off-stage social side of it.  The headliner will talk to management about you good or bad.  If you want to work with your hero again, follow the advice above and they may even ask for you next time through town.

For more tips on how to make money in stand-up comedy, order my paperback, Don’t Wear Shorts on Stage, or get the ebook from Kindle, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, etc.

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About Rob Durham

With an English Degree, three years as a doorman at the Columbus Funnybone, over a decade of stand-up experience, and a recent certification in teaching high school English class, writing a book seemed like the next inevitable step for Rob Durham. The son of a coach, Rob has an excellent ability to teach and explain things in the easiest and most direct way possible. His (often labeled ridiculous) memory allows him to think of every possible situation that a new comic might face because at one point he was there too. Rob gives an inside look at comedy that doesn’t sugarcoat the challenges every performer faces. Without ego and the myth that “anyone can do it” Rob gives the reader a true feel of what living the so-called dream feels like, from preparing for that first open mic night to touring the country. View all posts by Rob Durham

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